Wellbeing activities

  • “This simple sensory countdown activity is a great way to regain focus, and put your mind in an aware and receptive state. Relax and count through the following:

    5 things you can see
    4 things you can touch
    3 things you can hear
    2 things you can smell
    1 thing you can touch

    You can write them down if you find that easier, this may be an exercise you could do as part of a recovery journal process. ”

  • “This exercise is designed to reduce stress and anxiety. Take a fruit - an apple, orange, kiwi, banana, anything you have in your kitchen - and imagine its the first time you have ever seen one. Think about what it looks like, it's colour and shape; how it feels in your hand, its texture; how it smells; how it tastes. Concentrating on the fruit allows you to clear your mind of distractions and worries, giving all your attention to the present moment. ”

  • “Drop your shoulders, loosen your stomach, relax your eyebrows, and drop the tongue from the roof of your mouth ..... just for now. I'm not sure what happened today, I don't know what's going to happen tomorrow or next week or next month...I have no idea. But there is one thing that I do know, for sure, and it's that right here and right now we have time and we are safe, and we have the ability to sit for a minute where everything is ok. And THAT is something to be grateful for, so speaking of gratitude, real quick, take a look around, find 3 things to be be grateful for, go. ”
     Andrew Bird https://www.tiktok.com/@dreadfulbird

  • “Hands-on activities can be helpful during times of stress, and this exercise also encourages you to take some time out for self-care. Using easy recipes (such as the one in the link below) you can make your own scented skin rub, and can personalise it to your own tastes by using different scents. The act of making the scrub can be sensory and calming, and you get to give yourself a pamper gift for later. ”
     DIY Sugar Hand Scrub https://homemadeforelle.com/diy-sugar-hand-scrub

  • “Mindful walking offers an opportunity to step outside and reset the mind, as well as reduce stress and anxiety. Take a small walk (or a longer walk if you feel able), allowing you to move those muscles AND exercise your mind. This is an observational exercise, it's directed at seeing the things we usually do not notice. Instead of looking and seeing a sign, tree or person, look at the individual qualities of the environment - the colours, shapes, sounds and smells, light and shadows, the sensations on your skin. This helps to reconnect you with your own body, relax your mind and destress, and allows to be fully present in the moment. ”

  • “Create a quiet space. This should be a place where you feel safe, with lots of soft blankets or comfortable seating. Turn down the lights, and put on some sound cancelling headphones - not to play music, but to block out external noise and offer a sense of security. Remind yourself that you are in a safe space, and somewhere you can take some time - even if only a minute or two, to just BE. ”

  • “When you’re feeling anxious, you might notice that your heart rate and breathing get a bit faster. You may also begin to sweat and feel dizzy or lightheaded. When you’re anxious, getting your breathing under control can relax both your body and mind. To get your breathing under control when you’re anxious, follow these steps:

    Sit in a quiet and comfortable place. Put one of your hands on your chest and the other on your stomach. Your stomach should move more than your chest when you breathe in deeply.

    Take a slow and regular breath in through your nose. Watch and sense your hands as you breathe in. The hand on your chest should remain still while the hand on your stomach will move slightly.

    Breathe out through your mouth slowly.

    Repeat this process at least 10 times or until you begin to feel your anxiety lessen.”
     Healthline https://www.healthline.com/health/anxiety-exercises

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